Stands a good chance of success on three scores, first it is a good story, second, Duranty's name carries weight in the...

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ONE LIFE, ONE KOPEK

Stands a good chance of success on three scores, first it is a good story, second, Duranty's name carries weight in the field of Russian background, third, the impetus of its selection as August Literary Guild book will give it plus advertising. The interest in Soviet stories is somewhat on the wane -- this is a good enough tale in itself to take that hurdle. Duranty's sympathetic understanding of the people of whom he writes and the two sides of the sources of revolution makes it a sound book. Well paced as to plot:- a story of a youth brought up as servant and companion to the children of an aristocrat, exiled to Siberia as a scapegoat for his young master, and thereafter in perpetual flight from authority, fertile soil for revolutionary seed. Fearless -- foolhardy -- imaginative -- swayed by passions and moods, he plays the game of the Revolutionary forces in various capacities, under various aliases, finds conflict between his love and his loyalties and the ideals win. He parts with the girl he loves, and sets alight the fuse that will explode the center of counter-revolutionary activities where she was found again. -- It's not a tremendously important book, but it is thoroughly readable. It presents no new facet of the revolution, but it is sympathetic and objective. Sell on the Duranty name and fame -- with assurance of good reading.

Pub Date: Aug. 12, 1937

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 1937