With Williams' Boston (below), the first in a new series, fourth grade in look and reading level. This one is elementary but...

READ REVIEW

CHICAGO: Midwestern Giant

With Williams' Boston (below), the first in a new series, fourth grade in look and reading level. This one is elementary but indicative re settlement and growth, manufacturing and other commercial enterprises, recreation and education, somewhat obfuscatory re municipal government and critical issues. ""No matter where they come from, all her immigrants learn to be proud of Chicago"" proud also of Mayor Daley it would seem from the shot of the 1968 convention featuring Daley for President placards. Boosterism and other blather aside (""Children make their own fun--even in the rubbish-filled yard of a West Side slum""), the book is adequate for an introduction--to Chicago's strategic location, leading to its preeminence as a distribution and transportation center: to the prevalence of ethnic enclaves and identities (though the influx of Southern poor is unmentioned): to Chicago in its various guises of convention and medical center and jazz mecca. If there's none of Sandburg's ""Stormy, husky, brawling/ City of the Big Shoulders"" about this Midwestern Giant. oes, with its many illustrations, serve as a sort of super-brochure.

Pub Date: Dec. 30, 1970

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: McGraw-Hill

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 1970