Mr. Oursler, whose non-fiction has included Narcotics; America's Peril and Father Flanagan of Boy's Town, writes an official...

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THE BOY SCOUT STORY

Mr. Oursler, whose non-fiction has included Narcotics; America's Peril and Father Flanagan of Boy's Town, writes an official history of the Boy Scouts of America with dedication and a deep admiration for their accomplishments over the years. This is in a way unfortunate as the eulogy seems an overcompensation for the innate merits of the organization. The book is well documented and the many anecdotes add to reader interest. A dramatic opening with a story of William D. Boyce's meeting with Baden-Powell in London in 1909 introduces Boyce's work in founding the American branch of Boy Scouts. The meaning behind the movement then, as the scouting of fun and peace, prepares the way for Baden-Powell's own rather exciting life and how the realization of his ideals led to a world wide organization. Continuing with the American branch, Oursler's account goes on to relate ideals and activities. With the establishment of a creed and the changing patterns of organization over the years, go the outward manifestations of scouting- the men like Ernest Thompson Seton and Dan Beard who led the movement here, the techniques of camping and the different varieties of scouting, the handbook, how leaders are trained and so forth. A final note on the tough road to brotherhood and the challenge of the future add their weight of tribute to a worthy group.

Pub Date: Feb. 3, 1954

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 1954