A brief, readable page or so describes each of 40 of the ""food plants which the Indians found in nature's larder."" These...

READ REVIEW

INDIAN HARVESTS

A brief, readable page or so describes each of 40 of the ""food plants which the Indians found in nature's larder."" These include not only the many nuts, berries and fruits familiar to us and the maple sap previously unknown in Europe but young fern fiddleheads, the rootstocks of bulrushes and cattails, the ""delicious and tender"" palm cabbage which it kills the tree to pick, the bitter pine bark often ground into flour for bread, the jack-in-the-pulpit or Indian turnip which loses its peppery quality when dried and boiled, and the nutritious camass bulbs said to have contributed to the war with the Nez Perce under Joseph in 1877. Readers discover in passing that pine nuts are still a chief money crop of many Indians and that Menominee means ""the wild rice people,"" find out about poisonous parts of the partially edible pokeweed and poisonous lookalikes of the wild carrot, and learn how to make Indian lemonade from the sumac fruit. Handsomely designed, illustrated by Ronald Himler's delicate line drawings, this is more browsable than Lavine's Indian Corn and Other Gifts (KR, p. 58).

Pub Date: April 1, 1974

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: 128

Publisher: McGraw-Hill

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1974