Everyone is fond of saying what a remarkable document the U.S. Constitution is, and, cliche though it may be, remarkable is...

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COURT AND CONSTITUTION IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY: A Modern Interpretation

Everyone is fond of saying what a remarkable document the U.S. Constitution is, and, cliche though it may be, remarkable is really the only word for this concise yet immensely expansive piece of paper which has underpinned the American legal structure for two centuries, or the life of the nation. Swindler, a very able constitutional scholar (William and Mary Law School), wrote two earlier volumes of the same main title exploring in considerable detail the major turning points and crises experienced by the High Court since 1889, the time at which the old attitude of judicial laissez-faire started to crumble and the latter-day doctrine of constitutional federalism -- application of the Fourteenth Amendment to the States, etc. -- began to emerge. This third and final volume systematically reviews the new interpretations of the Constitution and its amendments which have occurred during this century, with emphasis naturally on decisions since the New Deal which have affected the vital amendments. Not the kind of book you read but consult -- an annotated guide through the constitutional thicket and helpful appendix to the earlier volumes.

Pub Date: Jan. 1, 1973

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Bobbs-Merrill

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1973