Considering Fahey's frequently awkward and/or show-off style (""But the intention here is to celebrate the hard-boiled...

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F. SCOTT FITZGERALD And the American Dream

Considering Fahey's frequently awkward and/or show-off style (""But the intention here is to celebrate the hard-boiled virgin, though the nominative aspect of the phenomenon is rather more evident than the adjectival"") along with the lengthiness of his analyses of all of Fitzgerald's fiction, what characterizes this as a book for YA's is chiefly its didactic tone. But instead of guiding young readers to their own insights and appreciations Fahey dispenses conventional literary wisdom in the form of undocumented pronouncements: This Side of Paradise ""is a bad book, but it rings true,"" and ""The language used (in ""Absolution"") to indicate the transformation is cheap and pretentious, a load of lie itself, and it fails of its desired effect."" Then too, the questionable moralizing that wouldn't be tolerated in an adult book is no less annoying here (Gatsby represents the materialistic American dreamer who ""overlooks or is unaware of the fact that the fullest kinds of pleasure come from the cultivation of sensibilities, the development of understanding, and the refinement of taste""). Another made-to-order critical biography, for librarians faced with highschoolers who prefer this kind of homework help to Mizener's more valuable treatment.

Pub Date: July 1, 1973

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: T. Y. Crowell

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 1973