Combine the vacuous, fuzzy prettiness of the worst imports from Japan with the splashy color of Wildsmith's more...

READ REVIEW

MY ANIMALS

Combine the vacuous, fuzzy prettiness of the worst imports from Japan with the splashy color of Wildsmith's more impoverished imitators and you have something like this ""foremost"" Czechoslovakian illustrator's full page animal portraits. Sad to say they are just what Armstrong's text deserves, as his first sentences confirm: ""Green Meadow wept and her dewdrop tears dripped from leaf to leaf and fell upon the ground. She called to her mother, Nature, in her sadness, and Ground Breeze carried her message of sorrow."" Green Meadow's problem is that Unpredictable Man has taken away her ""beautifully spotted cows and snow-white sheep,"" but to compensate bountiful Mother Nature sends Rabbit (""I will bring joy to you""), fawn (""You yearn for beauty which you thought was lost""), pheasant (""I bring you beauty in looks, proud dignity in walking, and noble service in living with you""), and thirteen others, each of whom touts his own contribution in a simpering one-page introduction. Green Meadow sighs when ugly, grimy-looking Wild Hog appears to root out the brambles that are making the edges of her garment ragged (but changes her mind when she sees the Piglets) and sighs again, speechless, when Great White Heron arrives to save her happy, dancing brook; the only unharmonious note is sounded by kill-crazy Weasel who is driven from the land by Porcupine. "" 'Mother Nature thinks of everything, doesn't she?' Green Meadow mused"" when Jumping Mouse explains the balancing function of her tail, and then West Wind passes through bringing all the creatures peaceful sleep. The greatest kindness you can pay to Armstrong is to leave them to their oblivion.

Pub Date: May 1, 1974

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1974