The plight of the American Negro has, with the start of a real civil rights movement, become the subject of intensive...

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THE SCHOOLCHILDREN

The plight of the American Negro has, with the start of a real civil rights movement, become the subject of intensive scholarly inquiry. The history of the Negro, his family life, his rights and his failings have all been the subject of recent commendable studies. But much of this work has dealt with ""The Negro""-- the stereotype. The studies have made their slow parade from bookstore, magazine rack, television Set into the home of the ""interested"" and the essentially uninvolved American to be catalogued and quoted along with the casualty figures of Vietnam or the expenditures to make war on poverty. The Schoolchildren does not belong in this catalogue though it may suffer the same fate. It is an attack by two women, teachers in the New York public school system working in East Harlem and Harlem, on the monumental failures and the ridiculous assumptions of a white middle class system of education which has not seen and will not see what is before it. It is told not in charts and graphs or with footnotes and bibliography but with the narrative and the dialogue of classroom sessions and home visits. The failure, the blindness, the terror are here stripped bare of the coldness of statistics. This book conveys not the measure but the sound of our failures. For those who have not walked through Harlem or Watts or Hough -- this is what is sounds like--somebody should listen.

Pub Date: March 4, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Pantheon

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1966