Young Bascomb McGoslin, whose mother dies of cancer and whose father is an incurable alcoholic, is brought up in New York by...

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GEMINI

Young Bascomb McGoslin, whose mother dies of cancer and whose father is an incurable alcoholic, is brought up in New York by Sean, his Irish grandfather; he has a turbulent, but heartfelt affair (at 17) with June Cyzmanski, the sensitive daughter of a crude, nouveau riche used-car dealer, gets a job after high school graduation as a clerk in a Catholic publishing house and, overwhelmed by ""the calm and quiet and orderliness"" of an Anchorite monastery in New Jersey which he visits on business, decides to break away from his life of ""sin"" and become a Titan priest. The author devotes the remaining three-quarters of the book to Bascomb's first year at the monastery -- the people, duties, and studies which contribute to his emotional and intellectual emergence as a man. The style of Bascomb's narrative -- his self-conscious but extremely honest manner of thinking --his sense of humor, and his search for simplicity and happiness with himself are very reminiscent of Saul Bellows' Augic March. His ultimate decision to leave the priesthood is thoroughly consistent with the character that William Kelley has so roundly drawn, and, except for a somewhat tedious beginning, this should be solid and provocative entertainment for mature readers.

Pub Date: Oct. 15, 1959

ISBN: 0595007015

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1959