For the manager who never made it to business school, this is a successful popularization and simplification of management...

READ REVIEW

THE SUCCESSFUL MANAGER IN GOVERNMENT AND BUSINESS

For the manager who never made it to business school, this is a successful popularization and simplification of management techniques with a stress on the importance of morale among workers. Van Dersal considers employee turnover, career systems (recruitment, selection, training, promotion, retirement), training devices, supervisory practices, selection and development of higher-up personnel, staff responsibilities (especially the function of the specialist), reports, conferences, and inspection. He points out that if productivity is really the objective one must keep other matters in mind: the ""grapevine"" (if decisions are made secretly, rumors will run amok), ""expectation"" (if you expect poor performance, you get it), motivation (achievement, recognition, the work itself, responsibility, and advancement are all factors), participation (the more employees feel a part of the decision-making process, the higher the work output), attitudes (people don't naturally dislike work -- a strict punishment-reward system, however, diminishes their incentive), and communication (the freer the employee feels to speak his mind and the more open the channels, the better the results). All of which is quite practical advice -- albeit predictable.

Pub Date: Jan. 15, 1974

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Harper & Row

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1974