The Detroit News, the admirably unfettered and sometimes crotchety voice of Motortown, U.S.A., will be 100 years old in...

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THE NEWS OF DETROIT: How a Newspaper and a City Grew Together

The Detroit News, the admirably unfettered and sometimes crotchety voice of Motortown, U.S.A., will be 100 years old in August and this is the account of how the paper was founded by James Scripps to give the workingman a real two cents worth (no kidding, that's what it originally cost) and grew up with the community through the auto age, hubcapping events from the appearance of Henry Ford's sassy Tin Lizzie to the nasty labor strife which now and again rent the industry. It's a work of innocent puffery, following the traditional rules of the centennial genre: a record of the accomplishments of the sheet's editors and publishers through the years, outstanding features like Nancy Brown's advice column ""Experience"" and the crime-expose forum ""Secret Witness,"" crusades for civic improvement and against political corruption, and its notable stands on national issues (down with X-rated films, down with that ""organ of the nation's intellectual elite"" the New York Times for publishing the Pentagon Papers). Standard transmission, with automatic photos.

Pub Date: July 16, 1973

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Little, Brown

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 1973