This attempt to cash in on the ""Save the Everglades"" movement differs from others in that it devotes relatively little...

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THE EVERGLADES: From Yesterday to Tomorrow

This attempt to cash in on the ""Save the Everglades"" movement differs from others in that it devotes relatively little space to describing those unique aspects which make them worth saving. True we are told several times of the ""strange beauty"" of the ""wild and wonderful"" Everglades and, to be fair, the author does find a bit of time to show how man's lack of foresight has created a chain of ecologically disastrous events which continue to threaten the future of the entire south of Florida. It seems to be the disasters however which have most captivated Mr. Blassingame's imagination. His elaborate and dramatic descriptions of the hurricanes which essentially wiped out the towns south of Okeechobee in 1926 and 1928 are replete with screams and tumbling bodies. Similarly his historical chapter on ""Outlaws, Indians, Pirates, Fishermen"" which relates with relish the bizarre and usually gory lives of selected Florida weirdos, many of whose lives bear only the slightest relationship to the Everglades per se, occupies an inordinate percentage of the book. Fortunately Lauber's responsible exploration (KR, 1973) makes it easy to pass this one up.

Pub Date: Jan. 28, 1974

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Putnam

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1974