THE STONES BEGIN TO DANCE by Aben Kandel

THE STONES BEGIN TO DANCE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Are we too harrowed and haunted by the war to find a place for this slim novel of one segment of the dispossessed, the flotsam of refugee Europe who have sought refuge in that slum section under the Williamsburg Bridge, New York City? It seems inevitable that books which in other times might reach our social consciences are finding small recognition today. Perhaps the fey quality, the tenderness and the not too saccharine sentiment will carry this to the people who liked Nathan's One More Spring... It is the story of old Marco, to whom all the neighbors turned for spiritual and practical advice. He was as poor as they, but he had a sense of drama and imagination, and it was he who thought of transporting a little Polish family and their pathetic possessions from the sidewalk on Delancy Street, to the regal portals of an apartment house on Park Avenue where their absentee landlord lived. It was he who led the pilgrimage of all the pushcarts to City Hall to plead for a right to continue their scrubby struggle for a livelihood in a market under the bridge. It was he who put through the plans for a final party in the market for all who had ever worked there. And when an uninvited guest came for him at the end, he was ready to go. One could wish the manner of telling the story had been simpler.

Publisher: Duell, Sloan & Pearce