A well-designed, authoritative guide to private equity—even for inexpert readers.

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THE PRIVATE EQUITY PLAYBOOK

A brief but comprehensive introduction to the inner machinations of private equity. 

In 2018, more than a third of all mergers and acquisitions in the United States involved private-equity investment, which is an expanding, multitrillion-dollar industry. According to debut author Coffey, the CEO of commercial refrigeration company CoolSys, private equity provides a surfeit of opportunities for middle-market companies and individual investors to build substantial wealth. However, the terrain is technically complex and populated by intensely competitive “players,” he says; indeed, Coffey’s self-described primer, from its title on down, is driven by sports analogies as he aims to give readers a “basic understanding of the private equity game.” He starts at the most elemental level, explaining the basic nature of private-equity firms and the structure of equity agreements as well as quantitative measures of their success and failure. In addition to explaining key technical terms, Coffey explicates the historical growth of the industry and the ways in which it may be mined for wealth. Furthermore, he furnishes an astute analysis of the hierarchical structure of the firms themselves and what one can likely expect from interactions with leadership: “Never play short ball and focus on just price—unless price is all that matters to you,” he notes at one point. “Be cognizant of the firm’s personalities and reputations.” Coffey’s style is as lucid as it is informal. His expertise is beyond reproach, as he has 20 years of experience running three private-equity backed companies. Although his counsel can be rather broad—he carefully points out he’s “not providing legal, career, or financial advice in this book”—it will be no less insightful or helpful to the uninitiated. Coffey explicitly targets his book at two kinds of readers—CEOs who may be looking to sell private equity, and executives aspiring to C-suite positions at private-equity-backed companies. However, it should also be a valuable resource for anyone looking for a single-volume introduction. 

A well-designed, authoritative guide to private equity—even for inexpert readers. 

Pub Date: Feb. 14, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-5445-1327-0

Page Count: 184

Publisher: Lioncrest

Review Posted Online: March 14, 2019

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

SEVERAL SHORT SENTENCES ABOUT WRITING

New York Times columnist and editorial board member delivers a slim book for aspiring writers, offering saws and sense, wisdom and waggery, biases and biting sarcasm.

Klinkenborg (Timothy; or, Notes of an Abject Reptile, 2006), who’s taught for decades, endeavors to keep things simple in his prose, and he urges other writers to do the same. (Note: He despises abuses of the word as, as he continually reminds readers.) In the early sections, the author ignores traditional paragraphing so that the text resembles a long free-verse poem. He urges readers to use short, clear sentences and to make sure each one is healthy before moving on; notes that it’s acceptable to start sentences with and and but; sees benefits in diagramming sentences; stresses that all writing is revision; periodically blasts the formulaic writing that many (most?) students learn in school; argues that knowing where you’re headed before you begin might be good for a vacation, but not for a piece of writing; and believes that writers must trust readers more, and trust themselves. Most of Klinkenborg’s advice is neither radical nor especially profound (“Turn to the poets. / Learn from them”), and the text suffers from a corrosive fallacy: that if his strategies work for him they will work for all. The final fifth of the text includes some passages from writers he admires (McPhee, Oates, Cheever) and some of his students’ awkward sentences, which he treats analytically but sometimes with a surprising sarcasm that veers near meanness. He includes examples of students’ dangling modifiers, malapropisms, errors of pronoun agreement, wordiness and other mistakes.

Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

Pub Date: Aug. 7, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-307-26634-7

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: May 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2012

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