THE 9TH DIRECTIVE by Adam Hall
Kirkus Star

THE 9TH DIRECTIVE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Adam Hall received all kinds of tributes (and awards-MWA) for last year's Quiller Memorandum: he's much more comparable to Le Carre than Deighton--there's that aura of professional anonymity about loner Quiller, and a thin-lipped resignation/determination (""It feels like morning. It feels like the morning after a lifetime""). On this mission, no less strenuous but less complicated, than his last, he's assigned to see that The person remains unharmed when he makes an official appearance in Bangkok. Through a narcotics contrabandist, Quiller secures the name of the killer Kuo, an Asiatic with impassive eyes behind smoked glasses, and Kuo will assassinate The Person--unless.... The dossier has a monosyllabic high tension along with a certain intellectual trim--psychocybernetic mechanisms, for example, and then there are all the appliances of overkill, Lasers, long-range rifles, fast-moving cars.... It moves, with authority, and the publishers plan to expedite it like The Kremlin Letter. BIG. FAST.

Pub Date: Jan. 9th, 1966
Publisher: Simon & Schuster