THE IDEA OF FREEDOM, Vol. II by Adler  J.

THE IDEA OF FREEDOM, Vol. II

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Like its predecessor the Idea of Freedom in a aterling, scholar-worthy tome of significance to the philosopher, cultural historian and graduate student working in ? areas. A very and erudite affair, it concerns itself with a dialectical of all known contraversies is regard to its titled subject matter. Written by Adler of Chicago's Great Books fame, this almost consistently brilliant work and criticizes the issies and debates of 25 centuries as reflected in political, social and epistemological pursuits of liberty. There is the ""Circumstantial freedom of self Realization"" whose major participants include Aquinas, Hobbes, Locks, ""Acquired Freedom of Self Perfection,"" represented by Augustine, Kant, Hegel, etc.; and ""Natural Freedom of Self-Determination"", covering among others Aristotle, Adam Smith, Bergann and Besides which two special variants are correlated Freedom"", that possessed only by citizens through right of and juridical appeal as in Moriequiteu and Hobbhouse; and ""Collective Freedom"", which will be possessed by humanity in the future when the revolutionary ideal of established, the basis of Marx, Comte and Bukunin. Adler the case in central rather than is doctrinal innguage, yet such academic concerns of conceptual attack states, casual initiative and indeterinancy, all come to life. Tightly knitted with cross-references, quotations, and a formidable bibliography. The Idea of Freedom is an important and once toward the solution of an age old problem which more than anything else underlies picture of world politics and power. A highbrow work indeed inhered, but one which library should have and recommend.

Pub Date: Oct. 20th, 1961
Publisher: Doubleday