YOUR WEALTH-BUILDING YEARS: The Secrets of Money Management for the First 15 Years of Your Working Life by Adriane G. Berg

YOUR WEALTH-BUILDING YEARS: The Secrets of Money Management for the First 15 Years of Your Working Life

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A slapdash financial/investment manual aimed at young adults (in the 21-35 age bracket) with above-average annual incomes ($16,000 or more) and high hopes for material success. Berg (an attorney and financial planner) provides dismayingly uneven counsel within an eccentric format that starts with the conventional injunction to establish realistic goals. From here, she moves directly to a sketchy survey of investment opportunities, which does include a handy checklist for evaluating the trade-offs involved in alternative commitments. Next comes a woefully inadequate briefing on non-salary compensation plans and other fringe benefits that may be available from employers. Back on the home front, Berg offers the diffident tips on checking their status as legatee; this section features sensible (if callous) directions on how to acquire a nest egg by owning a life insurance contract on one's parents. Having bridged this generation gap, the author segues into a series of venturesome advisories on real estate, budgeting, and credit. Before running out the string with quicky rundowns on retirement and tax planning (in which bond swapping and other advanced tactics rate scarcely a paragraph each), Berg devotes a whole chapter to the presumptive powers of positive thinking. She cites at some length the work of Count Michale de Saint Arnaud, an apostle of ""cognetics."" His I-think-l-can theories will remind many of those to be found in The Little Engine That Could. There are far better choices for fast-trackers seeking dependable guidance on their personal financial affairs. One superior possibility is Beth Brophy's Everything College Didn't Teach You A bout Money (10.312).

Pub Date: Feb. 25th, 1985
Publisher: Newmarket Press--dist. by Harper & Row