A TIME FOR DREAMING by Adrien Stoutenburg

A TIME FOR DREAMING

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Reed Simpson sighed as he watched Olive Stebbins leave the biology classroom. Reed suddenly begins looking for snakes, raising a mouse, collecting specimens, because Olive is a dedicated biology student. After bowing low before the great Olive for weeks, he gets tired of her -- she is first and last, an active opportunist, anyway. He sees Sally with her glistening smile (made brighter by shining braces) through more mature eyes, and relaxes in the thought that they will marry some day. A procession of various animals fascinates Reed for a while, but never seems intriguing to the reader. As a day-dreamer wandering vaguely about, Reed does not lead an exciting life; this is made more obvious in the book, which in uneventful, tiresome, and dull. It is not in the same class with Window on the Sea, 1962, p. 243, J-81, an interesting book by the same author.

Pub Date: April 22nd, 1963
Publisher: Westminster