THE STORY OF THE BOOK by Agnes Allen

THE STORY OF THE BOOK

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KIRKUS REVIEW

In the manner of a series of lectures to children (""you remember, don't you...""), an informed, wide-ranging account of the evolution of writing, printing, books and libraries from ancient Egypt to modern Britain. The material on the development of writing duplicates many widely-available texts, but it is distinguished, by a precise appreciation of style. Also commendable is the attention to the changing form of the book, especially in the Early Christian and medieval periods; the discovery of early codices becomes an intellectual quest, and Biblical scholarship is made simple. However, few Children will Follow the detailed descriptive history of illuminated manuscripts in the British Isles. (English events receive disproportionate attention for an American, audience throughout.) The sections on modern printing and publishing hardly count, and the book begs for more extensive illustration. Consider it best for what it does best--as an interesting angle on the intellectual history of Western Europe, with emphasis on Great Britain--and consider whether you need it.

Pub Date: Aug. 7th, 1967
Publisher: Roy