NAPOLEON IN RUSSIA by Alan Palmer

NAPOLEON IN RUSSIA

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The Russian campaign revisited, with emphasis on the fortunes of battle, the infighting of strategists, and of course the weather. Palmer (a British historian of modern Europe) takes it up to 1813 with the Tsar's triumphant trip to England and the death of Bonaparte. Like R. F. Delderfield in The Retreat From Moscow, (p. 720), Palmer underlines the Emperor's self-deceptions and hesitations; he has less to say about the soldiers of the Grand Army, more to tell about the Russians (including guerilla bands and Cossack raiders). The military emphasis is stronger, if only by default, since Palmer gives much less attention to issues, causes. He gets an A for description, making solid (and less obtrusive) use of primary materials. His style is fast and clear, and instead of a rash of footnotes, he provides helpful ""notes on sources"" for each chapter. Neither liveliness nor competence alter the fact that it's a narrow book for a limited audience, however.

Pub Date: Jan. 1st, 1967
Publisher: Simon & Schuster