THE YOUNG MASTERS by Alan Scholefield

THE YOUNG MASTERS

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

Two or perhaps more insets have been loosely basted together by the presence of a youngster, Paul Thompson and through him the nascent sense of apartheid during World War II in South Africa when black was only Coloured. First met while attempting to escape an orphanage destiny at the age of ten, Paul is making an 800 mile journey from Cape Town to an aunt and is under the devoted surveillance of a kaffir, Luther, from whom he will be separated en route. In the second part Paul is attending one of those public schools where there are the scenes of incidental brutality one expects. But the closing episode will remind him of the final indignity imposed on Luther and the sense of loss and injury which has only too rightfully stayed with him. All of this seems real enough now to what obtained back then although Mr. Scholefield never extends the summary (i.e. sketchy) particulars with which he deals in such a modest fashion.

Pub Date: Jan. 20th, 1971
Publisher: Morrow