PASCAL'S RECOVERY OF MAN'S WHOLENESS by Albert N. Wells

PASCAL'S RECOVERY OF MAN'S WHOLENESS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The author, who is minister of the Presbyterian Church of Laurinburg, North Carolina, takes Pascal's Pensee 792 as the key to the problem of co-ordinating scientific, philosophical, and theological thought in our time. The chief problem of contemporary thought is the problem of radical diversity in views and accounts of reality offered by specialists from the perspective of their particular fields. Pascal's ""orders,"" as set forth in 70% provide a way to the overcoming of this diversity. While each is unique, ascent to a higher order is not to be achieved by compounding a lower. The three orders--the worldly or material, the intellectual, and the spiritual-charity, describe a wholeness that can make both scientific and Christian truth tenable, and can provide a perspective from which life and existence become not only bearable but ultimately meaningful. The development of this thesis hangs upon a framework of the chronology of Pascal's own development, but includes wide excursions into the thought both of Pascal's and of our own time. The result in a closely reasoned and generally well-supported argument. The question likely to be asked by the modern reader is whether, granted the argument of the book, the problem with which it is concerned can really be solved by resort to the categories used.

Pub Date: April 5th, 1965
Publisher: John Knox