TEMBA DAWN: The Story of a Boy and His Calf by Alec Lea

TEMBA DAWN: The Story of a Boy and His Calf

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Rob, who lives on a farm in Scotland, receives his own calf, Temba, for a birthday present and is lucky enough to be on hand when she is born. He is so devoted to her that he spends his spare time reading aloud in her stall, and even when the farm must be sold to make room for an encroaching town he is able to take her along to his new house in the country. The way Lea tells it, with obvious empathy and close familiarity, readers are sure to agree with Rob's school friends that he is truly fortunate to have her, and are sure to share his deep interest in every detail of her raising--and in other details of dairy farming such as the arranged mating of a bull and calf. And the drama is inherent, the calf's development and the aging bull's unpredictability providing excitement enough without any manipulated storms or traumas, so that the whole story sort of glows with honest sensibility.

Pub Date: Sept. 1st, 1975
Page count: 134pp
Publisher: Scribners