Measured yet passionate, a compelling look at one man’s struggle against the worst of corporate blaming and the hard-earned...

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A MATTER OF CONDUCT

THE TRUE STORY OF A MAN WHO BATTLED A BANK AND WON

Many people will experience being fired, but, as Yap details in this cleareyed, often gripping memoir, his being fired was just the beginning of decadelong torment.

As a rising star at Citizens Bank, one of several prosperous Jamaican banks in the early 1990s, Yap seemed to have it all: a record of sterling employee reviews, leadership of an innovative and respected technology division, a harmonious multigenerational home life, and excellent pay, with the promise of more to come. His life was seemingly ideal, until early October 1993, when he was unceremoniously fired from his job and slapped with a multimillion-dollar lawsuit. Shamed by false accusations, his assets frozen, Yap turned to a local attorney and family acquaintance to try and fight the charges. The ensuing battle to clear his name and free him of the social and financial burdens took roughly a decade, culminating in his case before the Privy Council in London, the highest court for Commonwealth nations. With precision and passion, Yap relates the technical and legal details of his battle, which included the first use of the Mareva injunction in modern Jamaican history. Even when delving into the inner workings of contracts and chargebacks, the righteous anger and pained humiliation sizzle between the lines of Yap’s measured, self-deprecating prose. Almost as important as the technical details are the insights into Yap’s family life, which he highlights with understated sadness and bursts of both Jamaican slang and earthy profanity. Quotes from his wife, children, and friends round out the details of Yap’s tumultuous life during this period, and to his credit, Yap neither goes overboard in assigning blame nor ignores his own failings and mistakes that compounded his feelings at the time.

Measured yet passionate, a compelling look at one man’s struggle against the worst of corporate blaming and the hard-earned wisdom that resulted from his fight.

Pub Date: Sept. 28, 2012

ISBN: 978-0986941375

Page Count: 232

Publisher: Sassy Sunflower Books

Review Posted Online: May 22, 2015

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2015

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

SEVERAL SHORT SENTENCES ABOUT WRITING

New York Times columnist and editorial board member delivers a slim book for aspiring writers, offering saws and sense, wisdom and waggery, biases and biting sarcasm.

Klinkenborg (Timothy; or, Notes of an Abject Reptile, 2006), who’s taught for decades, endeavors to keep things simple in his prose, and he urges other writers to do the same. (Note: He despises abuses of the word as, as he continually reminds readers.) In the early sections, the author ignores traditional paragraphing so that the text resembles a long free-verse poem. He urges readers to use short, clear sentences and to make sure each one is healthy before moving on; notes that it’s acceptable to start sentences with and and but; sees benefits in diagramming sentences; stresses that all writing is revision; periodically blasts the formulaic writing that many (most?) students learn in school; argues that knowing where you’re headed before you begin might be good for a vacation, but not for a piece of writing; and believes that writers must trust readers more, and trust themselves. Most of Klinkenborg’s advice is neither radical nor especially profound (“Turn to the poets. / Learn from them”), and the text suffers from a corrosive fallacy: that if his strategies work for him they will work for all. The final fifth of the text includes some passages from writers he admires (McPhee, Oates, Cheever) and some of his students’ awkward sentences, which he treats analytically but sometimes with a surprising sarcasm that veers near meanness. He includes examples of students’ dangling modifiers, malapropisms, errors of pronoun agreement, wordiness and other mistakes.

Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

Pub Date: Aug. 7, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-307-26634-7

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: May 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2012

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