MAY THIS HOUSE BE SAFE FROM TIGERS by Alexander King

MAY THIS HOUSE BE SAFE FROM TIGERS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Mine Enemy"" is a year older -- more widely known through benefit of Jack Parr, and more recently King's own TV program. And now, in waspish anecdote, highly colored personal opinion, and occasional downright vulgarity he provides a fairly enervating diet for the book reader. Despite the jacket blurb, this is not a book by a man who thinks ""life is fun"". It is the smart alecky protective wit of a man who has had four wives, ten years of dope addiction, and many other apparently valid excuses for some swinging sourness. His gift for anecdote, invective, and the tidily true phrase is all too often expended in rancorously spitting at the dope addicts, unwashed Bohemians, advertising fraternity, etc. among whom he has spent his time. As antidote, heavily disguised, there is a good deal of sentimentality. Most of this is clothed in bop-type prose so swift, so glittering with adjectives and the hostilities usually unvoiced, that it gives a surface impression of sophistication -- and is too often amusing to read. With 39 weeks of best sellerdom for the first book, this minority opinion will doubtless be a voice crying in the wilderness. Rancor can be dangerous when it is made to appear genial, cultured, creative.

Pub Date: Jan. 13th, 1959
Publisher: Simon & Schuster