MEMOIRS OF A HETEROSEXUAL by Alexander Rose
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MEMOIRS OF A HETEROSEXUAL

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Certainly destined to be one of the most entertaining autobiographies of the year, this is about a five foot giant who made up in enterprise what he lacked in education. He grew up as part of ""a brood of self-centered nuts"" who frantically trailed father Sam, a plumber, as he plunged erratically around the country in search of the greenest grass. Meanwhile, mother tried to keep a kosher home...or just a home. Alexander divided his time between the pool hall and the ""Useful Arts"" section of the nearest library. Because he felt that everyone was talking about him he learned lip-reading. He wanted to be a detective so he learned shorthand (eventually ending up second best in the country). He decided to be a musician so he learned the violin (becoming so expert he finally taught) and in his ""constant rush toward a place in life"" became a writer, actor, court reporter, inventor (a patented musical typewriter), linguist, world traveler, and radio and television personality. He has some terribly funny anecdotes, particularly about his childhood and the year he hitchhiked to San Francisco. Then there was the movie The Hustler and teaching Paul Newman how to hustle Gleason. Memoirs should make it in the same market that made Everything But Money which had a similar cashet.

Pub Date: Feb. 1st, 1967
Publisher: Simon & Schuster