THE PRACTICE OF IDEALISM by Alfred Bingham

THE PRACTICE OF IDEALISM

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This book may bring the audience he deserves to the author of Techniques of Democracy (co-editor of Common Sense). It is an arresting and notable book, eminently readable, and a challenge to the idealist. The conservative will look upon it as ""the New Deal for the world"", since he feels that this war is further proving the need of organising an effective world community for a fuller realization of the abundant life for all people. He fears ""the man who is afraid of the future"" because he was too contented with the past; he fears the man who reveres the Constitution without knowing its content or its history; he fears the man who wants some kind of international authority ""controlled by the white man"". He believes we can have progress and prosperity at home if we help other nations to prosper. He recommends production to capacity after the war, without worry over costs which are a matter of book-keeping. He recommends planning and control to a minimum, leaving ""a maximum of freedom to the individual, to the businessman, to the worker and to the consumer"". And he recommends an Office of Peace Mobilisation to use to the full our manpower and resources.

Pub Date: March 24th, 1944
Publisher: Duell, Sloan & Pearce