SUPPER AT THE MAXWELL HOUSE by Alfred Leland Crabb

SUPPER AT THE MAXWELL HOUSE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Dinner At Belmont (Bobbs, Merrill, P. 47, 2/1/42 Bulletin) was the story of Nashville during the Civil War, this, the continuation, is of the city's rebirth under the Reconstruction, limning the many influences at work that helped and/or hindered the complete re-union with the North and the rehabilitation of the town and the people. Symbolized by the Maxwell House, begun just before the war, and used as a prison during the four years, everything and everybody is forced to start over again, rebuild from scratch. Center of interest are the Coles, mother and son, making every effort to earn enough to buy back the family estate, Kingsley, first in the hands of the unscrupulous bank head, later bought by Adams, a Northerner. Adams' daughter falls in love with young Cole, but Kingsley, as well as her father, stands in the way of their romance, until matchmaking Mrs. Polk takes the reins. There is the honest, but inhuman Governor, the origins and deeds of the Ku Klux, the progress at Maxwell House, and its first dinner for the public, the hard lessons of practicality and poverty for the Southerners. Perhaps a shade too black and white, and oversimplified, nevertheless a flavorsome novel of the period.

Pub Date: June 15th, 1943
Publisher: Bobbs, Merrill