THE PLEASURES OF SAILING by Alfred Stanford

THE PLEASURES OF SAILING

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

Here again is a book that seems oddly timed, in days when sailing for pleasure is, for the most part, strictly limited. Perhaps for that very reason, this should be good ""escape reading"". The author is an amateur yachtsman of wide reputation, and is now on active duty in the Navy. He is fired with a contagious zest and love of the sport, whether in small boats or large, and is convinced that everyone, given the opportunity, an acquire the love of sailing (I wonder--being of the unregenerate race of women who don't like it). Almost he convinces me, as he meanders delightfully down the mazes of the psychology and philosophy of sailing, the role of skipper and his prerogatives, the importance of harmony with the sea as a test for the boat, experiences of his own and others in small boats, helmsmanship and personality, the simple virtues which come to the fore in sailing, the basic simplicity of navigation, ""a seventh grade subject, really"", the adventure of cruising and discovery. He believes--and persuades one--that sailing is actually an intensification of living. For a special market.

Pub Date: March 25th, 1943
Publisher: Simon & Schuster