SEQUOYAH OF THE CHEROKEES by Alice Marriott

SEQUOYAH OF THE CHEROKEES

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KIRKUS REVIEW

His life is told with the care due it, by a well known writer on North American Indians and their cultures. As the boy who was to become the Cherokee genius with his invention of a written alphabet for his peoples' language, Sequoyah was born lame. He was also born the son of northern trader, Nathaniel Gist, who married Wut-teh, a chief's daughter, on one of his visits to the tribe. Thus Sequoyah, though brought up as an Indian, felt the influence of a white man's background too. He spent two years fighting with Jackson in the War of 1812 and when he returned, his life had become so reflective that his wife divorced him for being lazy and Sequoyah was left with his daughter Ahyoka, who helped him with the alphabet, sharing honors with recognition. Compare this with Frances Williams Brown's Captured Words (Aladdin, 1954), which has more reference to the actual letters.

Pub Date: Sept. 6th, 1955
Publisher: Random House