THE LOVELY WORLD OF RICHI-SAN by Allan Bosworth

THE LOVELY WORLD OF RICHI-SAN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The author, a retired officer of the United States Naval Intelligence, writes of his two visits to Japan, after World War II. Bred in the feeling that the Japanese were our enemies, he found Richi-San and her mammoth family a revelation. From him, they learned ""English"". From them, he learned that a great faith, sensitivity; and appreciation of kindness as well as beauty resides in these people. Richi-San, a thirty-seven-year-old widow who looked like a child, became the author's constant campaign. Together they climbed Mount Fuji, made excursions to the country, and together they set about the difficult task of teaching the eager Richi-San how to speak that language so foreign to her own. For those with a serious questioning curiosity of Japan, this book is not recommended.---For one reason or another, Allan Bosworth seems neither to have acquired familiarity with the language or the deeper ramifications of Japanese thought. But for those who would read of a very delightful family, enjoy a pleasant retelling of the most popular of Japanese stories, and recapitulate famous pilgrimages as seen through the eyes of a Westerner, this book, brimming with good will (and with a few too many examples of the Japanese mispronunciation of the English language) should find its market.

Publisher: Harper