THE CROWS OF EDWINA HILL by Allan R. Bosworth

THE CROWS OF EDWINA HILL

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Apart from a few harsh realities like shooting cockroaches with ethyl chloride this book is all Navy romance in the crewcut American brand. Mr. Bosworth, an accomplished writer, loves the Navy in spite of enduring its paradoxes for some thirty years, and describes all the familiar salty types on the dear old ship plus some enigmatic natives of the traditional port. The ship in port is The Bustard (careful there), a graceless submarine rescuer, and her brightest light is Doc Doolittle, whose derring-dos include his attempt to return a temple bell, a questionable war souvenir, to its rightful ringing place. All this rings in a chorus of characters; Mike Riley, the commanding officer, who never forgets the birthdays of his crew members, cake-wise; Tommy, a pretty Navy Nurse, Japanese by birth, American by choice, who keeps Doc busy arguing about women's rights; a sweet little Japanese servant girl who falls in love with a green young sailor. There are also dopey heroin peddlers and a very personable typhoon introduced by the crows of the title. It's a pleasant amusing book, Navy-wise -- no villains, no heartbreak.

Pub Date: Feb. 1st, 1960
Publisher: Harper