SCIENTISTS AND NATIONAL POLICY-MAKING by

SCIENTISTS AND NATIONAL POLICY-MAKING

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

A good, thorough, if wordy analysis of a current complex and hotly debated subject is offered in 10 essays by political scientists who examine the relationships and influence of the scientist on the body politic-- for the most part since his arrival on the postwar government scene. But the overall nature and political effect of the ""science affairs community"" in this broad new area of prestige are hard to assess clearly now. Areas discussed include the ""scientific Establishment (Price), an ""apolitical elite (R.C. Wood), the scientific advisor (Brooks), American science policy (Sayre), the President's science advisors, strategy (Wohlstetter), strategists (Brodie), etc. There are more words of warning than promise, although the scientist is seen to be loyal to science and to his own ways of solving problems as he moves into juxtaposition with the politician, law-maker and administrator. Unlike these, he does not adopt the coloration and opportunism of the political scene. There is, unfortunately, almost no mention of another very significant area of influence for the scientist-- that of an adequately informed electorate who support or decry national policies according to their own desires on the basis of objective technical knowledge offered by unbiased scientists. Nevertheless, this anthology is valuable as an early appraisal of this new phenomenon affecting the government and people of America.

Publisher: Columbia Univ. Press