THE WOMEN AT PINE CREEK by Allis McKay

THE WOMEN AT PINE CREEK

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This pleasant, albeit elementary, women's novel spins out female pioneer fidgets in the state of Washington, beginning at the turn of the century. Althea, firm and determined spinster, who had singlehanded raised her brother and sisters, and Mary, pretty, divorced, bent on doing her best for the Pillage family reputation in the wilds of Washington, take over. With a minimum of quavers, they run the homestead in a tiny rural community, and with books, bone china, and gentility are prepared to hold their ground against the rough terrain and rougher neighbors. Mary teaches school and Althea manages the farm and orchard. Hired hand Ben Lucas soon claims Mary's affections, but Mary is plagued with guilt about leaving her sister, until Althea announces her forthcoming marriage with an ""in town"" banker. Ben and Mary are happily married with two children. Seasons and crops come and go, and it is not until Ben is at war (WWI) that Mary wonders if the great moments have been great enough. A young man named Lew fans the flames, but Mary is a sensible girl and knows full well where she really belongs, back to Ben and pickling and canning. Uncomplicated, female fare.

Publisher: Macmillan