PAN-AMERICANISM FROM MONROE TO THE PRESENT: A View From the Other Side by Alonso Aguilar

PAN-AMERICANISM FROM MONROE TO THE PRESENT: A View From the Other Side

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The author is a Mexican economist. The book is intended as an overview for general readers. (If anything, Aguilar has gone overboard in avoiding rigorous economic analysis.) His thesis: in practice, pan-Americanism has been used to promote the expansion of U.S. monopolies and the extension of U.S. influence. . . the antithesis of Bolivar's hopes for progressive regional integration. After demonstrating the truism that the Monroe Doctrine was never intended to foster Latin independence, the first part of the book examines U.S. aggression and intervention below the border. The Mexican and Spanish-American Wars are dealt with too briefly. The compilation of lesser-known military abuses is useful. Aguilar relates them to the turn-of-the-century decline in U.S. profit rates and options for internal expansion. More than half the book is devoted to the post-World War II period, and the hemispheric defense system which has served to undermine Latin sovereignty and protect U.S. privileges from popular struggles for self-determination. The Alliance for Progress, the O.A.S., the Dominican intervention are discussed from this point of view. Again, greater depth and specificity might have been achieved without spoiling the book's considerable general appeal. Primary sources are used to full effect, making this a good supplement to American history studies, and reinforcing the claim that the only people for whom Yankee imperialism has been painless are ourselves.

Pub Date: Dec. 9th, 1968
Publisher: Monthly Review Press