THE STARVED AND THE SILENT by Aloysius Schwartz

THE STARVED AND THE SILENT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This book is based on the author's diary for the years 1957-1964, when he served as a Maryknoll missionary in Korea. Believing that there is striking similarity between the social-economic conditions of Palestine at the time of Christ and those of Korea today, he attempts to set forth the inner mind of poverty--the ""poor-thinking"" which he finds so different from the ""rich-thinking."" As a theological premise, he takes the position that since Christ himself took upon himself the life of poverty, this condition has been sanctified, and the poor given a unique spiritual quality and character. Poverty, therefore, is not to be considered from a merely pragmatic or humanistic point of view. Yet he makes an urgent plea for financial support for the work of missions which seek to deliver the poor from the ever-pressing question of where the next meal is to come from, or the fear of what will happen if sickness strikes--and presumably deliver them, also, from this state of sanctity. The book is written with a sense of the author's deep concern for the poor.

Pub Date: Feb. 18th, 1965
Publisher: Doubleday