THE SCHOOLHOUSE IN THE CITY by Alvin-Ed. Teffler

THE SCHOOLHOUSE IN THE CITY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Probably the most cogent set of strategies for saving urban education to appear in some time and, more important, a rare nexus of theorizers and implementers. The book's genesis was a Ford Foundation financed conference held at Stanford last year to outline the problems facing the cities and their school systems and to offer solutions--some of them radical. Psychologist Kenneth Clark, long active in HARYOU, suggests that public education has failed in the ghetto and that schools run by unions, corporations, even the military, are a viable alternative. In answer, John Fischer, the president of Columbia Teachers College, demands proof that outside agencies could do the job. The case for school decentralization is presented; but a civil rights leader warns against it. Urban planners, architects, educational philosophers offer specific models for ""the post-enclave school""--changes both in the relation of the school to the city and in the physical plant itself. Editor Alvin Toffler, whose basic preoccupation is the implications of social change on education and psychology (his forthcoming book, Future Shock), strings the selections together with future-oriented introductions which stress the need for immediate action to prepare the urban schools for ""postindustrial society."" In all, no final answers but several provocative proposals.

Pub Date: Oct. 1st, 1968
Publisher: Praeger