THE BATTLE OF THE WILD TURKEY by Alvin Johnson

THE BATTLE OF THE WILD TURKEY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Several stories, sketches and reminiscences about the old West have as their author the novelist-economist whose courtly style, humor, and educated cowboys and tramps resemble those of the novels of Eugene Manlove Rhodes. Even the real, memorable characters of the sketches (settlers, farmers, old ladies, Indians, etc.) show the effects of education on the rowdy West, and the taming of frontier ways is uneven and often very funny. Pioneer, storytelling Granny McBride vs. her ""modern"" daughters-in-law with their scheduled babies and rewritten Mother Goose---or the writer accompanying a pregnant, educated Indian friend on a train to her accouchement- are tart, charming, insightful tales. The two novellas show East versus West at greater length: Henry joins the tramp workers and becomes part of the fascinating saga of the West's change from hand labor to mechanical combines; Hobart, a Latin scholar, after a brief success in the money-making world, flees to a ranch which he equips with labor-saving devices, is swept into marriage by a determined tomboy, and wins a highly individual fame and happiness... Originality, real information, an educated wit and playfulness distinguish these stories and they are a pleasure to read.

Pub Date: Aug. 9th, 1961
Publisher: Atheneum