CHILDREN OF THE SEVENTH PROPHECY by Amy Kateman Rubin

CHILDREN OF THE SEVENTH PROPHECY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

There were seven prophecies, and evil has gained as they went unheeded. Now, with trolls and humans split, one race underground and one above, the evil Unking sends his shadows out to complete the earth's destruction by burying the Light of the Seventh Propecy. Fm this hyped-up opening Rubin sends the young troll prince Klig into a more down-to-earth human kingdom, where he meets magic-loving Bernard and his friend Alice, forming the trio destined to save the Seventh Prophecy. The children's first setback occurs when Bernard persuades Klig, who has that power, to change shapes with him. The two are separated before they can change back; and so, when the scroll containing the prophecy comes into their hands, it is Klig and Alice alone who must carry it into the troll kingdom and, from there, to the Dark Woods. ""You must go where you would most fear to go, farther and farther until you are there,"" directs Klig's mother in time-honored fantasy tradition. The philosophical and psychological foundation for the adventure is not an inch deeper than it need be, and the ultimate confrontation with the dark Unking no more compelling--one slip, and they'd all be revealed as playing at mumbo-jumbo. Nevertheless Rubin, who writes with ease, has studied the genre and mastered its patterns, while creating a believable everyday world for the human children and generally eschewing high-sounding clutter.

Pub Date: March 30th, 1981
Publisher: Warne