THE OPAL-EYED FAN by AndrÉ Norton

THE OPAL-EYED FAN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Scenic ""Lost Lady Key,"" first the haunt of a vanished Indian tribe, the Old Ones (all have vanished but one, Askra, an old witch), and then of the Spanish (who left a ghost behind to remember them by) is fuller of spirits than cypresses. Persis Rooke, who is shipwrecked there circa 1800, can hardly take a walk without running into a ghost, particularly after she finds the buried opal-eyed fan that conceals a dagger--or does it find her? Fortunately, the ghosts and the dagger inspire her with enough gumption to save her man and her fortune from the unskillful plots of pirate Ralph Grillon and his Lydia. Good thing, too, because Persis is a complete wimp without a supernatural assist. Norton, so good. at tales of aliens, smart animals, and the brotherhood of all species, is a washout at romantic leads. One cannot believe that any Gothic passions beat under these starched frocks; and no trace of characterization enlivens these waxen features.

Pub Date: Nov. 18th, 1977
Publisher: Dutton