FOIE GRAS, MAGRET, AND OTHER GOOD FOOD FROM GASCONY by Andre & Anne de Ravel Daguin

FOIE GRAS, MAGRET, AND OTHER GOOD FOOD FROM GASCONY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

De Ravel's introduction speaks of a general return from nouvelle cuisine to traditional ""lusty,"" ""robust"" cuisine bourgeoise--and the selections here mark that return with a vengeance: What Gascony does is foie gras; and now that the requisite moulard ducks are bred and raised by a Catskills corporation (the specially fattened geese are apparently still unavailable), American cooks can try to emulate the Gascon farm wife's--or Gascon chef-restauranteur Daguin's--many ways with foie gras (wrapped in leeks, poached in chardonnay, baked with green pineapples and rum. . .), foie gras terrine, confit (cooked in duck fat), magre (breast of fattened moulard duck), cassoulet (with moulard legs confit), salads (most containing liver, duck fat, or duck confit), or, for a change, equally hearty daubes of beef or game. (Only a few seafood recipes offer relief from the fat.) Though it's difficult to envision Americans lining up to devein the livers of fresh-killed moulard ducks, this appreciative and expert guide will appeal to culinary adventurers, fill a niche in serious collections, and serve nicely as a gastronomic travelogue.

Pub Date: Dec. 13th, 1988
Publisher: Random House