THE LAST OF THE BOHEMIANS by Andre Beucler

THE LAST OF THE BOHEMIANS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This book is a tender and simple memoir of the French poet, Leon-Paul Fargue, written by his best friend and the inseparable companion of the last twenty years of his life. Fargue, not too well known to most Americans, was the poet who had dedicated himself to the commemoration of Paris, of Paris streets, railroad stations, dance-halls, bistros,- in a word- the Paris of the people. He was also the acknowledged exponent of surrealistic verse, in his early days a friend of Mallarme, and in the latter years the intimate of Picasso and Paul Valery. Fargue was gay, whimsical, casual, tender, witty and warm-hearted. And from the day he met Beucler in 1924 he included him in all his larks and pranks as well as his invitations to the parties of celebrities, and made him his constant companion in his endless ramblings through the tortuous streets of Paris. The shared experiences and conversations here are increasingly engrossing. If Fargue was no towering figure, he had at least the capacity to stimulate many friendships to which this book gives loving testimony- and among them you will find Ravel, Marie Laurencin, Edmond Jaloux, Cocteau, Darius Milhoud, etc.... An initiated audience here, but an appreciative one.

Pub Date: Oct. 20th, 1954
Publisher: Morrow-Sloane