Misses an important mark or two, but passionately and cleverly champions the Catholic faith.

A CATHOLIC SURVIVAL GUIDE

A wide-ranging, playfully irreverent guide to 21st-century Catholicism.

An American generation raised on the stern televised nostrums of Archbishop Fulton Sheen will hardly be prepared for the tone and execution of this nonfiction collaboration from Mack Hicks (Social Self and the Social Desirability Motive, 2015, etc.) and debut author Andrew Hicks. And that dissonance is no doubt intentional. The Hickses are serious Catholic apologists using a wide array of disciplines and techniques to make their case for faith, citing everything from applied psychology to Bayes’ Theorem. Throughout most of their book, however, they also strive to leaven their deeper concerns with lighter tones. They mention, for instance, that people pay to talk with psychologists, whereas “confession is a safe place to disclose the private, inner self, and Catholics get it for free.” This empirical approach can have pitfalls—the authors’ overview of arguments for the historicity of Jesus, for instance, is wobbly as is their assessment of the famous Shroud of Turin. But the sheer energy of the overall defense on broader subjects compensates quite a bit for the occasional factual lapses that can occur in religious apologia. On the notorious Catholic sex scandals, readers may be surprised to find a mild response. The authors counsel both a more nuanced reading of the Church’s (ultimately faulty) attempts to rehabilitate offending priests and, even more controversially, an avoidance of “hysterical” reactions. The authors are particularly clear on defending the record of Christianity in general and Catholicism in particular throughout history as a progressive force in defense of intellectual inquiry and a more ethical treatment of women than other options throughout the ages (“Both Plato and Aristotle endorsed infanticide,” they write, “and guess which gender they were eliminating?”). Catholics especially will treasure such an upbeat defense of their world.

Misses an important mark or two, but passionately and cleverly champions the Catholic faith.

Pub Date: May 1, 2019

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: 192

Publisher: Splenium House, LLC

Review Posted Online: July 18, 2019

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A wonderful page-turner written with humility, immediacy, and great style. Nothing came cheap and easy to McCandless, nor...

INTO THE WILD

The excruciating story of a young man on a quest for knowledge and experience, a search that eventually cooked his goose, told with the flair of a seasoned investigative reporter by Outside magazine contributing editor Krakauer (Eiger Dreams, 1990). 

Chris McCandless loved the road, the unadorned life, the Tolstoyan call to asceticism. After graduating college, he took off on another of his long destinationless journeys, this time cutting all contact with his family and changing his name to Alex Supertramp. He was a gent of strong opinions, and he shared them with those he met: "You must lose your inclination for monotonous security and adopt a helter-skelter style of life''; "be nomadic.'' Ultimately, in 1992, his terms got him into mortal trouble when he ran up against something—the Alaskan wild—that didn't give a hoot about Supertramp's worldview; his decomposed corpse was found 16 weeks after he entered the bush. Many people felt McCandless was just a hubris-laden jerk with a death wish (he had discarded his map before going into the wild and brought no food but a bag of rice). Krakauer thought not. Admitting an interest that bordered on obsession, he dug deep into McCandless's life. He found a willful, reckless, moody boyhood; an ugly little secret that sundered the relationship between father and son; a moral absolutism that agitated the young man's soul and drove him to extremes; but he was no more a nutcase than other pilgrims. Writing in supple, electric prose, Krakauer tries to make sense of McCandless (while scrupulously avoiding off-the-rack psychoanalysis): his risky behavior and the rites associated with it, his asceticism, his love of wide open spaces, the flights of his soul.

A wonderful page-turner written with humility, immediacy, and great style. Nothing came cheap and easy to McCandless, nor will it to readers of Krakauer's narrative. (4 maps) (First printing of 35,000; author tour)

Pub Date: Jan. 1, 1996

ISBN: 0-679-42850-X

Page Count: 320

Publisher: Villard

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 15, 1995

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IN COLD BLOOD

"There's got to be something wrong with somebody who'd do a thing like that." This is Perry Edward Smith, talking about himself. "Deal me out, baby...I'm a normal." This is Richard Eugene Hickock, talking about himself. They're as sick a pair as Leopold and Loeb and together they killed a mother, a father, a pretty 17-year-old and her brother, none of whom they'd seen before, in cold blood. A couple of days before they had bought a 100 foot rope to garrote them—enough for ten people if necessary. This small pogrom took place in Holcomb, Kansas, a lonesome town on a flat, limitless landscape: a depot, a store, a cafe, two filling stations, 270 inhabitants. The natives refer to it as "out there." It occurred in 1959 and Capote has spent five years, almost all of the time which has since elapsed, in following up this crime which made no sense, had no motive, left few clues—just a footprint and a remembered conversation. Capote's alternating dossier Shifts from the victims, the Clutter family, to the boy who had loved Nancy Clutter, and her best friend, to the neighbors, and to the recently paroled perpetrators: Perry, with a stunted child's legs and a changeling's face, and Dick, who had one squinting eye but a "smile that works." They had been cellmates at the Kansas State Penitentiary where another prisoner had told them about the Clutters—he'd hired out once on Mr. Clutter's farm and thought that Mr. Clutter was perhaps rich. And this is the lead which finally broke the case after Perry and Dick had drifted down to Mexico, back to the midwest, been seen in Kansas City, and were finally picked up in Las Vegas. The last, even more terrible chapters, deal with their confessions, the law man who wanted to see them hanged, back to back, the trial begun in 1960, the post-ponements of the execution, and finally the walk to "The Corner" and Perry's soft-spoken words—"It would be meaningless to apologize for what I did. Even inappropriate. But I do. I apologize." It's a magnificent job—this American tragedy—with the incomparable Capote touches throughout. There may never have been a perfect crime, but if there ever has been a perfect reconstruction of one, surely this must be it.

Pub Date: Jan. 7, 1965

ISBN: 0375507906

Page Count: 343

Publisher: Random House

Review Posted Online: Oct. 10, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1965

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