THE INTERNET

SURFING THE ISSUES

The latest entry in the Issues in Focus series covers the growth and development of the Internet, its history and potential future, and some of its uses, especially as it applies to children. In this context, McCormick discusses a range of issues, from control and censorship to security, spamming, privacy, and the limits to the Internet’s growth. She concludes with extensive back matter, including guides to newsgroups and organizations. The discussion of controversies is dispassionate and balanced; the author leaves the answers to some questions open. Such a thorough summary of facts and opinions on a still-new medium will be useful to students doing research, and to educators looking to lay out the facts for nervous parents. (chronology, notes, glossary, bibliography, index) (Nonfiction. 11-14)

Pub Date: Aug. 1, 1998

ISBN: 0-89490-956-8

Page Count: 128

Publisher: Enslow

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 1998

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SHORT

WALKING TALL WHEN YOU’RE NOT TALL AT ALL

Randy Newman famously sang, “short people got no reason to live,” but Schwartz presents himself as living proof that being short is no obstacle to happiness or success. Functioning as both a memoir and an advice book, the narrative shares the author’s experiences of growing up short in a culture that favors the tall and explores scientific facts about height. Using examples from marketing, mythology and psychology, it shows that the cultural obsession with height can be unhealthy and even dangerous and that prejudice against the short persists. The author offers readers sound advice on both how to avoid falling into the trap of believing shortness is synonymous with inferior and the healthy lifestyle everyone should pursue to realize his or her full potential growth. There are extensive recommendations for further reading and study. The narrative’s conversational style is appealing and engaging, and its personal and objective insights are thoughtful and helpful. The author quotes Newman then successfully proves him wrong. (Nonfiction. 11-14)

Pub Date: April 1, 2010

ISBN: 978-1-59643-323-6

Page Count: 144

Publisher: Flash Point/Roaring Brook

Review Posted Online: Dec. 30, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 2010

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SCIENCE FAIR SUCCESS USING HOUSEHOLD PRODUCTS

Middle-school science students will find this title a useful jumping-off place for science explorations using readily available household products, including toothpaste, shampoo, soap, hand lotion, sun block, detergent, aspirin, and orange juice. The author begins with a review of the scientific method and detailed safety warnings, then presents a variety of projects, for example, evaluating shampoos for cleaning power, analyzing aspirin for the amount of active ingredient, and testing the vitamin C content of orange juice. The author notes all the experiments included are to help the reader become a more educated consumer and to have fun with science. For science-fair projects, additional research and elaboration would be necessary. Some useful extension ideas include investigating “anti-bubbles,” and exploring the scientific concerns regarding overuse of antibacterial products. One experiment, testing large doses of lipid-soluble vitamins on the ability of planarian worms to regenerate lost parts does not seem to provide sufficient safeguards for humane treatment of the experimental animals. A sturdy, readable, and useful title in the “Science Fair Success Series.” (brief glossary, further reading, useful Web sites, suppliers, index) (Nonfiction. 12-14)

Pub Date: Feb. 1, 2002

ISBN: 0-7660-1626-9

Page Count: 112

Publisher: Enslow

Review Posted Online: May 20, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 2002

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