A BILL OF PARTICULARS by Ann Marbut

A BILL OF PARTICULARS

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

...in the case of Nancy Cameron, who, when her Scott Fitzgeraldish parents closed her out of their lives, turned to her grandfather, Judge of common pleas in a Pennsylvania town, brings to light the hard road of a county's first woman lawyer when Nancy puts her profession ahead of her career as a woman. Grand D turned against her, even past her bar exams, and only came around when she won her first criminal case. The town contributed to her meager first years by indifference and small insults but, with Grand D, now a partner, Nancy was accepted. And she almost accepted Jamie Lord, dear and familiar from childhood; his death in the war meant a busier but emptier future. Then there was Dr. Jim Grant, only Nancy knew it still wasn't love, and it took Michael Shayne, a contractor Whose mother had given him the determination to spite or to show the town how successful he could be, to prove to her that law could not take the place of love. A woman's novel achieves a cut above much aimed at that market and has an authentic legal touch, (the author, too, was a lawyer); the town and its old families giving way to newcomers, the changes over more than twenty years, the cases, in court and out, are clearly mirrored and a basic part of Nancy's progress. Good reading.

Pub Date: Oct. 7th, 1955
Publisher: McKay