PHOEBE, THE SWISHY WITCH by Ann May

PHOEBE, THE SWISHY WITCH

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The law in witchdom is plain -- if you want a human to see you, you must make him perform a complicated spell without ever telling him what to do. He has to sew a bag of soft leather with a gold needle, gold thimble and hair from his head; put in the gold needle and thimble, a stone from a running brook, the eye from a potato, a mouse whisker and a mosquito wing; insert this in the nearest hollow tree at the stroke of midnight. Imagine communicating all this, and not even the tiniest hint allowed! But one-foot tall Phoebe, nicknamed the ""Swishy"" witch because she swishes her flying broom, is determined to make friends with lonely young Marilee Durbin; luckily she has a lot of friends to help her. The Durbin dog, the mice, the spiders and the flies agree to accumulate the materials, and Marilee takes the hint. Near midnight she follows Phoebe's sneezes to the hollow tree and finds the right spot marked by the witches' discouraged tears; at last they can play. Scaled down witchery and charm, just the right length and laughs.

Pub Date: Sept. 29th, 1967
Publisher: Bobbs-Merrill