MEDICINE MAN'S DAUGHTER by Ann Nolan Clark

MEDICINE MAN'S DAUGHTER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Deep in the Navajo country lived Chanter, most famous and powerful of medicine men. His daughter, Tall Girl, lived with him, and lived only to carry on the work of her father. Others had roamed beyond the stark wilderness to attend a Catholic school. After receiving an awaited sign, Tall Girl, realized that she must follow those who had gone in order to learn more about medicine. The uncomplicated story is shrouded in an impenetrable silence-- an Indian silence which is sustained too long. For, although the author skillfully writes in a poetic style, there is not enough of a story to re-enforce the clear writing. Tall Girl's dedication has obviously inspired the author, but the result of inspiration does not captivate the reader. More plot, less poetry, in this case, would have been advantageous. This story is not comparable to World Song, (1960, p. 149, J-105) by the same author.

Pub Date: April 15th, 1963
Publisher: Farrar, Straus & Co.