LET THE EARTH SPEAK by Ann Steward
Kirkus Star

LET THE EARTH SPEAK

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A first novel, but well above average, though the author suffers from the temptation to be so original in her style that she weakens the quality of a very original story by the method she has chosen to tell it. Four people, somewhat at odds with life and each other, come together through force of circumstances to live out one year on a Kentucky farm loaned them by a man, stranger to all but the father, who had gone through an unforgettable experience with him during the first world war. A letter, shared as the story unfolds, gives some clue to the strange atmosphere of the place, the personalities which haunt it, the people who are still part of the living picture. The Jarrells, little by little, find themselves in the picture, and through their giving and sharing and understanding, come to new life. The book has something of the philosophical impact of The Fountain, without that book's mature wisdom. Here is an author to watch, though this first book may find a limited market.

Pub Date: Oct. 8th, 1940
Publisher: Macmillan