IT MAY COME IN HANDY SOMEDAY by Ann Tompert

IT MAY COME IN HANDY SOMEDAY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A wagonload of bricks, another of lumber, a dozen wheels, several rolls of fencing, some rusty screens, a lamppost, 100 cans of paint and five ladders: this is only the beginning of the collection amassed by the little old man when he gets the idea that other people's castoffs might come in handy around his farm. As the old man scavenges, his garden is neglected and his wife is crowded off her front porch--but if none of the junk ever does come in handy, there's no serendipity in the ending either; the plot is simply turned around and played backwards, with a passing vagabond spreading word of the stash to neighbors who then arrive one by one to pick up items they can use. And there's an annoying glare to Bruce Cayard's smudgy yellow pages even though his black line drawings have a properly rickety-rackety look.

Pub Date: Sept. 24th, 1975
Publisher: McGraw-Hill