THE MYSTERY LADY by Anna Clark

THE MYSTERY LADY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

English professor Paula Glenning (Cabin 3033) has allowed herself to be persuaded by dynamic publisher George Bruce to write the story of Rosie O'Grady, for decades an almost mythical recluse writer of best-selling pulp romances. Paula senses something unrevealed behind Bruce's plan, but she sets out with helpful ex-lover James Goff (Last Judgement) to explore the possibilities. It soon becomes obvious that the real O'Grady, if she ever existed, no longer does, and the answer to the mystery of the stories' authorship lies with Robin Key, self-styled secretary-manager to O'Grady, who isn't telling. But Paula and James do their best, ferreting out ancient connections in obscure country places, trying to get a handle on O'Grady's history, and eventually are rewarded by finding Joan Cook, author of all but the first four novels, a fact well known to George Bruce. How Bruce's real aim in all this--regaining blackmail material from Key--was to be accomplished by Paula's research is unclear, as is most of this tepid, confused story. Likable Paula and James deserve better material.

Pub Date: Oct. 3rd, 1986
Publisher: Doubleday